Mark McDougal
Attorney
503.224.2647
mcdougal@kafourymcdougal.com

Mark is a seasoned trial lawyer who has been trying cases for over three decades. He developed his sense of justice growing up in the South during the civil rights movement. Mark’s father and great uncle were both law professors whose published textbooks have been used in law schools throughout the country. Under their influence, Mark knew from an early age that he wanted to be a lawyer.

Mark McDougal

personal highlights

Mark is dedicated to promoting the rights of citizens over corporations and insurance companies. He is an outspoken and tireless defender of people’s rights in cases ranging from First Amendment, civil rights, and unfair trade practices, to personal injury, medical malpractice, and product liability issues. He was a key organizer of the nationwide series of Ralph Nader “Super Rallies” that drew more than 200,000 Americans together in a show of solidarity for a progressive political agenda. Mark has a law degree from Tulane University, from which he also holds a B.A. in philosophy.

Mark handles the legal research, writing and appellate work at our firm. He has established case law before the Oregon Supreme Court that protects injured people and helps them to obtain a full recovery. He is also a strong advocate for the rights of injured undocumented workers. Mark is currently working to have the courts declare that undocumented workers are entitled to recover lost income in personal injury actions.

Areas of Strength

  • Arguing cases at the Oregon Court of Appeals and the Oregon Supreme Court
  • Handling complex cases over defective and unsafe products
  • Relentless cross-examination that forces witnesses to reveal themselves
  • Legal research and writing
  • Creating novel legal theories
  • Holding manufacturers responsible for on-the-job injuries
  • Identifying insurance coverage and contractual analysis

Additional videos

Mark McDougal at the Oregon Supreme Court

Mark McDougal Argues Kennedy v. Wheeler at the Oregon Supreme Court